Click here for our
current catalog

AIDS and HIV Essentials

Excellent Oral Surgery course for quick-reference to clinical problems!

Developed and edited by one of the specialty's most respected and distinguished surgeons, this new and completely up-to-date handbook functions equally well as a survival manual for residents, as a quick reference for experienced clinicians, as a go-to source for managing emergency situations, and as a study guide for anyone preparing for board exams. It articulates the standards of care recognized by all licensed practitioners and the specific protocols that must be followed in providing treatment for the surgical patient. Spanning the full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery, chapters address routine aspects of care such as doing a proper history and physical examination, interpreting lab tests and radiographs, and managing complications of dentoalveolar surgery; specialized treatment for patients with infections, cysts and tumors, salivary gland disease, neck masses, and other forms of oral and maxillofacial pathology; and protocols for managing anesthetic and medical emergencies, severely traumatized patients, and those with other life-threatening injuries.

Oral Surgery

How to know what to order? If you don’t have a copy of the textbook then choose the book and test option. Does a friend already have the book or do you? Then just order a test that can be delivered either via email or mailed as a hard copy.  All tests can be taken online or via our mail option.

Oral Surgery

Oral Surgery
(book and both tests) Traditional Hardcopy

10 hours    $113.00

Clinician's Handbook of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
(book only)

Oral Surgery
(both tests without the book)

10 hours    $50.00

Oral Surgery
(test only - Course 1)

5 hours    $25.00

Oral Surgery
(test only - Course 2)

5 hours    $25.00

Last reviewed: December 1, 2015
Expires: December 1, 2018

Oral Surgery

About the Authors

Hussein O. Ads, BDS, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Director, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois

Gary F. Bouloux, DDS, MD, MDSC, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

Eric R. Carlson, DMD, MD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Director, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Cancer Institute, Knoxville, Tennessee

Lee R. Carrasco, DDS, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Alessandro Cianfoni, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South CarolinaWilliam F. Conway, MD, PHD, Professor of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

Ellen Eisenberg, DMD, Professor and Section Chair, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut

James A. Giglio, DDS, MED, Adjunct Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond, Virginia

Leonie L. Gordon, MD, Professor of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

John M. Gregg, DDS, MS, PHD, Clinical Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond, Virginia; Adjunct Professor of Basic Sciences,Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia

Ronald L. Guttu, DDS, MSD, Private practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery, Beloit, Wisconsin

Barry H. Hendler, DDS, MD, Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Hospital Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine; Coordinator of Laser and Cosmetic Surgery (OMFS), University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Bruce B. Horswell, MD, DDS, MS, Director, First Appalachian Craniofacial Deformities Specialists Department of Surgery, Women and Children's Hospital-Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston, West Virginia

Markell W. Kohn, DDS, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego; Clinical Professor of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Daniel M. Laskin, DDS, MS, Professor and Chairman Emeritus, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond, Virginia

Robert D. Marciani, DMD, Professor of Surgery and Chief, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio

Oded Nahlieli, DMD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, Israel

Thomas A. Nique, DDS, MS, MD, Private practice of anesthesiology, Lawrence, KansasMorton B. Rosenberg, DMD, Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Head, Division of Anesthesia and Pain Control, Tufts University School of Dentistry; Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

Steven M. Roser, DMD, MD, DeLos Hill Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Chief, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

Salvatore L. Ruggiero, DMD, MD, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook, New York; Attending, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York

Steven R. Sewall, DDS, Associate Professor, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WisconsinMiller H. Smith, DDS, MD, Fellow in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Regional Maxillofacial Unit, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Mark J. Steinberg, DDS, MD, Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois

Robert A. Strauss, DDS, MD, Professor and Director, Residency Training Program, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth School of Dentistry, Richmond, Virginia

Timothy A. Turvey, DDS, Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Brent B. Ward, DDS, MD, Assistant Professor and Fellowship Program Director, Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Oral Surgery

Course Objectives

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  1. Procedures for presurgery patient evaluation and diagnostic tests.
  2. Protocol for oral surgery in hospitals.
  3. Techniques for managing patients undergoing oral surgery.
  4. Perioperative complications in medically compromised patients.
  5. Procedures for managing medical emergencies.
  6. Possible postoperative medical problems.
  7. Recommended techniques for dentoalveolar surgery.
  8. Management procedures for sedative and anesthetic emergencies.
  9. Treatment methods for cysts, tumors, lesions, salivary gland diseases, temporomandibular disorders, nerve injuries and dentofacial and craniofacial abnormalities.
  10. Procedures for treating maxillofacial trauma.
  11. Techniques for diagnosing and treating infections.

Oral Surgery

Table of Contents

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

1. Patient Evaluation— B. Hendler and L. Carrasco
2. Hospital Protocol and Procedure— M. Kohn
3. Laboratory Tests and Their Interpretation— R. Guttu
4. Diagnostic Imaging— W. Conway, L. Gordon, and A. Cianfoni
5. Interpretation of the Electrocardiogram— R. Strauss
6. Management of Fluids and Electrolytes— T. Nique
7. Nutrition for the Surgical Patient— M. Steinberg and H. Ads
8. Use of Blood and Blood Products— L. Carrasco
9. Basic Patient Management Techniques— D. Laskin
10. Management of the Medically Compromised Surgical Patient— S. Roser and G. Bouloux
11. Managing Medical Emergencies— R. Strauss
12. Management of Postoperative Medical Problems— M. Smith and B. Ward
13. Managing Complications of Dentoalveolar Surgery— J. Giglio
14. Diagnosis and Management of Sedative and Anesthetic Emergencies— M. Rosenberg
15. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Cysts and Tumors— R. Marciani
16. Management of Maxillofacial Trauma— S. Sewall
17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Infections— B. Horswell
18. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw— S. Ruggiero
19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Dentofacial and Craniofacial Abnormalities— T. Turvey
20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Salivary Gland Diseases— O. Nahlieli
21. Diagnosis and Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders— D. Laskin
22. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nerve Injuries— J. Gregg
23. Differential Diagnosis and Management of Oral Mucosal Lesions— E. Eisenberg
24. Differential Diagnosis of Intraosseous Lesions— E. Eisenberg
25. Differential Diagnosis and Management of Neck Masses— E. Carlson

Oral Surgery

CH 18: Diagnosis and Treatment of Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

Bisphosphonate therapy has been considered standard treatment in the managementof cancer patients with metastatic bone disease and patients with osteoporosis.The efficacy of these drugs is due to their ability to inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. However, the postmarketing experience withintravenous and, to a much lesser extent, oral bisphosphonates has raisedconcerns about potential side effects related to profound bone remodeling inhibitionand osteonecrosis isolated to the jaws. This chapter reviews the riskfactors, incidence, pathogenesis, prevention strategies, and management ofthis new complication.

Get In Contact With Us