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Family Violence

Some injuries are accidents, others are the mark of abuse. How can you tell the difference?

If a child sitting in your chair has injuries on both sides of his/her face, you should consider the possibility that abuse has occurred. Chapter 4 explains how to screen children for physical abuse. The key signs of domestic violence and elder abuse are also detailed in this coursebook.

Even when you know the signs, do you know what to say to patients you suspect are being abused? It's important to offer help. Figure 3 in our coursebook describes advocacy options for victims of domestic violence.

Note: This course offers credit to all licensees and satisfies the Child Abuse requirement for NY license applicants and the new 2-credit hour requirement for FL license renewal (every third renewal).

Family Violence

How to know what to order? This course comes as a booklet with the course and test all in one so you are only paying to take the test.  If you would like to receive an electronic copy of the booklet/test then choose our PDF email option! Would you rather receive a hard copy in the mail? Then choose the book/test option. Email courses will take their test online while those that choose the hard copy can either mail their test back in the envelop we provide for grading OR take your test right online for immediate grading.

Family Violence

Family Violence
(book and test) Traditional Hardcopy

2 Hours     $25.00

Family Violence
(PDF and test) Online Only

2 Hours     $25.00

Last reviewed: March 1, 2017
Expires: March 1, 2020

Family Violence

About the Authors

L. Kevin Hamberger, PhD, is a Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and Associate Program Director of the Racine Family Practice Residency Training Program. Since 1983, he has been involved in research and practice with domestic violence offenders and victims.

He is Co-Chair of the Wisconsin Governor's Council on Domestic Abuse and past Chair of the Wisconsin Batterer Treatment Provider Association. He has published 80 articles and books on partner violence, including Domestic Partner Abuse (1996, Springer) and Violence Issues for Health Care Educators and Providers (1997, The Haworth Press). He has served as a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Justice, and Department of Defense.

Family Violence

Course Objectives

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  1. Potential numbers of victims or perpetrators seeking treatment in health care facilities.
  2. Demographics and definitions of family violence and neglect in the United States.
  3. Signs and symptoms of inflicted maltreatment and potential long-term consequences.
  4. Techniques used to screen patients for current and past victimization and predisposing factors.
  5. Procedures for referring victims of maltreatment to community resources.
  6. Mandatory reporting laws and appropriate medical record keeping.

Family Violence

Table of Contents

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  • Directions
  • Objectives
  • Chapter 1   Introduction
    Demographics      
    Victims Who Seek Health Care      
    Types of Maltreatment    
    Predisposing Factors      
    Patient-Centered Intervention    
    Reporting Maltreatment    
    Community-Centered Intervention
  • Chapter 2   Identifying Physical Violence      
    Health Care Worker Responsibilities      
    Injuries to Intimate Partners    
    Injuries to Children      
    Injuries to Elders      
    Follow-up Care
  • Chapter 3   Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse      
    Violence Demographics      
    Power and Control Over Victims    
     Cycle Theory of Violence      
    Predisposing Factors    
    Interviewing Techniques    
    Batterers' Characteristics    
    Signs and Symptoms      
    Reasons for Denial    
    Case Management
  • Chapter 4   Child Maltreatment      
    Demographics      
    Predisposing Factors      
    Interviewing Techniques      
    Signs and Symptoms      
    Reasons for Denial      
    Case Management      
    Long-Term Consequences
  • Chapter 5   Elder Maltreatment      
    Demographics      
    Predisposing Factors      
    Interviewing Techniques      
    Signs and Symptoms      
    Reasons for Denial      
    Case Management
  • Chapter 6   Ethical and Legal Obligations      
    Ethical Considerations      
    Barriers to Intervention    
    Laws on Reporting      
    Reporting Procedures      
    Medical Record Keeping      
    Court Appearances
  • Appendix A: Definitions of Terms
  • Appendix B: Resources for Victims
  • Index

Family Violence

Table of Contents

Introduction
Violence and abuse are rampant worldwide, including the United States. For example, in Florida, one person dies at the hands of a spouse, ex-spouse, or cohabitant approximately every 3 days.

Health care workers are often the first persons to recognize inflicted injuries and to ask about their causes. Such observations and inquiries by health care workers can be the turning points for victims, who otherwise might be too fearful or ashamed to reveal their plights.

Demographics
Until the mid-20th century, violence occurring within family units was not widely recognized as a national problem. Then, in the early 1960s, the crusade to increase awareness of child abuse arose, and, in the 1970s, movements to prevent abuse of women and elderly persons emerged.

In the late 1990s, federal agencies studying "domestic violence" replaced that term with "intimate partner violence" to include all intimate partners, current or former, heterosexual or same-sex, cohabiting or not cohabiting.

Each year, several million persons in the United States are victims of violence inflicted by perpetrators, especially in domestic settings. Interpersonal violence has no boundaries. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

Because of definitional issues and methodologic differences among statistical surveys, estimates of the numbers of victims are probably low. Surveys do not typically include victims who are homeless, institutionalized, or non-English speaking.

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