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Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

From alcohol to Ecstasy - how much you know could help you avoid a life-threatening clinical situation...

Based on the third edition of Buzzed: The Straight Facts About the Most Used and Abused Drugs, this accessible course provides everything you need to know about:

  • stimulants (eg, cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine)
  • steroids
  • sedatives (eg, barbiturates [Nembutal], chloral hydrate)
  • opiates (eg, opium, heroin, cocaine)
  • nicotine (eg, cigarettes, chewing tobacco)
  • marijuana
  • inhalants (eg, nitrites, solvents, paints, sprays)
  • herbal drugs (eg, ginseng, melatonin)
  • hallucinogens (eg, LSD, mescaline, peyote, PCP)
  • Ecstasy
  • caffeine
  • alcohol

For a patient already under the influence of one of these substances, receiving an anesthetic or vasoconstrictor or taking a prescription drug could be life-threatening. The "Dangerous Combinations" section in each chapter will help you recognize and steer clear of trouble. Take this course and you'll know what's what.

Note: This course offers credit to all licensees, including those in the states with specific chemical dependency education (AZ, TN) and anesthesia-related (FL dentists) requirements.

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

How to know what to order? If you don’t have a copy of the textbook then choose the book and test option. Does a friend already have the book or do you? Then just order a test that can be delivered either via email or mailed as a hard copy.  All tests can be taken online or via our mail option.

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.
(book and both tests) Traditional Hardcopy

10 hours   $70.00

Buzzed: The Straight Facts About the Most Used and Abused Drugs
(book only)

$20.00

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.
(both tests without the book)

10 hours   $50.00

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.
(test only - Course 1)

5 hours    $25.00

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.
(test only - Course 2)

5 hours    $25.00

Last reviewed: January 1, 2015
Expires: January 1, 2018

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

About the Authors

Cynthia Kuhn, PhD
Professor
Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina

Scott Swartzwelder, PhD
Clinical Professor
Departments of Medical Psychiatry and Psychiatry
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina

Wilkie Wilson, PhD
Research Professor
Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Research
Associate Medical Research Professor
Department of Medicine
Duke University Medical Center

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

Course 1 Objectives

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  1. General and lethal characteristics of specific drugs
  2. Dangerous drug combinations and their negative interactions.
  3. Physiologic effects of drugs on different body parts.
  4. Processes that affect the "buzz" of ingested drugs.
  5. Effects of drugs on mental functioning and behavior.
  6. Methods of reducing negative effects of drugs.
  7. Conditions that promote tolerance to and dependence on drugs.

Course 2 Objectives

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  1. Physiologic effects of drugs on different body parts.
  2. General and lethal characteristics of specific drugs.
  3. Effects of drugs on mental functioning and behavior.
  4. Conditions that promote tolerance to and dependence on drugs.
  5. Medical uses of drugs discussed in this course
  6. Legal aspects of drug use.
  7. Processes that affect the "buzz" of ingested drugs.
  8. Methods of treating specific negative effects of drugs.
  9. Dangerous drug combinations and their negative interactions.

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

Table of Contents

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  • PART I
    Alcohol
    Caffeine
    Ecstasy
    Hallucinogens
    Herbal Drugs
    Inhalants
    Marijuana
    Nicotine
    Opiates
    Sedatives
    Steroids
    Stimulants
  • PART II
    Brain Basics
    Drug Basics
    Addiction
    Legal Issues 

    Further Reading
    Glossary of Drug-Related Street Terms/Slang Words
    Index

Drug Use and Abuse, 4th ed.

Alcohol

Drug Class: Sedative hypnotic

Individual Drugs: beer (5% or less alcohol); wine (9% to 12% alcohol); spirits, liquor, whiskey (40% or more alcohol)

Common Terms: liquor, whiskey, booze, hooch, wine, beer, ale, porter

The Buzz: When people drink, they feel pleasure and relaxation during the first half hour or so, often becoming talkative and socially outgoing, but these feelings are usually replaced by sedation (drowsiness) as the alcohol is eliminated from the body, so drinkers may become quiet and withdrawn later. This pattern often motivates them to drink more in order to keep the initial pleasant buzz going.

Overdose and Other Bad Effects: Under most circumstances, the chances of life-threatening overdose are low. However, people get into trouble when they drink a lot of alcohol very quickly - such as in a drinking game, on a dare, or when they can't taste the alcohol (as in punch or Jell-O shots). Drinking on an empty stomach is particularly risky. If a person becomes unconscious, is impossible to arouse, or seems to have trouble breathing, it is a medical emergency and immediate attention is necessary. Some very drunk people vomit, block their airway, suffocate, and die. Call for emergency medical assistance.

When drunk people pass out, their bodies continue to absorb the alcohol they just drank after they are asleep. The amount of alcohol in their blood can reach dangerous levels and they can die in their sleep. Keep checking someone who has gone to sleep drunk because it is during binges that most fatal overdoses occur.

Dangerous Combinations with Other Drugs: It is dangerous to combine alcohol with anything else that makes you sleepy. This includes other sedative drugs, such as opiates (eg, heroin, morphine, or Dermerol), barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), Quaaludes (methaqualone), Valium-like drugs (benzodiazepines), sleep medication like Ambien, and even the antihistamines found in some cold medicines. Finally, acetaminophen (the pain reliever in Tylenol) should not be used with alcohol, or shortly after drinking, because the combination could damage the liver.

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