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California Dental Practice Act

CE requirement for California dental licensees

During every 2-year renewal cycle, the Dental Board of California requires dentists  and dental auxilliaries to complete 2 CE units in California dental law, including:

  • The scope of practice for dentists and auxilliaries
  • The use of auxiliaries in dental practice
  • License renewal requirements
  • Laws governing the prescribing of drugs
  • Acts in violation of the Dental Practice Act and attending regulations
  • Citations and fines

All dental professionals are responsible for knowing the statutes and Board regulations governing the practice of their professions. Some professionals have committed violations, had their licenses revoked, been fined, and been imprisoned because they did not take this responsibility seriously. Protect yourself from disciplinary actions and malpractice claims by learning the facts presented in this clear, concise course. You cannot afford to be without this information.

California Dental Practice Act

How to know what to order? This course comes as a booklet with the course and test all in one so you are only paying to take the test.  If you would like to receive an electronic copy of the booklet/test then choose our PDF email option! Would you rather receive a hard copy in the mail? Then choose the book/test option. Email courses will take their test online while those that choose the hard copy can either mail their test back in the envelop we provide for grading OR take your test right online for immediate grading.

California Dental Practice Act

California Dental Practice Act
(book and test) Traditional Hardcopy

2 Hours     $25.00

California Dental Practice Act
(PDF and test (Email) Online Only

2 Hours     $25.00

Last reviewed: February 1, 2018
Expires: February 1, 2021

California Dental Practice Act

About the Authors

California Dental Practice Act

Course Objectives

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  1. California laws and regulations related to the practice of dentistry.
  2. Duties that different types of dental auxiliaries can legally perform.
  3. Laws governing the prescribing of drugs and administration of anesthesia and conscious sedation.
  4. Actions that violate California laws, and the resulting citations and fines.
  5. Laws on license and permit renewal, and biennial continuing education.
  6. Legal requirements related to infection control, advertising, and other dental office practices.

California Dental Practice Act

Table of Contents

When you complete this course, you will take a written or online test that measures your ability to identify:

  • Chapter 1 Introduction
    CE Requirement
    California Dental Practice Act
    California Code of Regulations
    California Health and Safety Code
    Why You Need This Course    
    Further Study
  • Chapter 2 Scope of Practice
    Dentists    
    Dental Auxiliaries
    Dental Assistants
    Registered Dental Assistants
    RDAs in Extended Functions
    Registered Dental Hygienists
    RDHs in Extended Functions
    RDHs in Alternative Practice
  • Chapter 3 Drugs, Anesthesia, & Sedation    
    Drug Prescriptions    
    General Anesthesia    
    Conscious Sedation    
    Oral Conscious Sedation for Patients Under    
    Age 13    
    Onsite Inspection and Evaluation
  • Chapter 4 Violations of Laws    
    License Revocation/Suspension    
    Citations    
    Penalties    
    Dental Record Violations    
    Safety & Treatment Violations    
    Infection Control Violations    
    Anesthesia/Sedation Violations    
    Drug-Related Violations    
    Licensure Violations    
    Advertising Violations    
    Monetary Violations    
    Disciplinary Violations
  • Chapter 5 Licensure Requirements    
    License Expiration and Renewal    
    Revoked/Canceled Licenses    
    Substitute Licenses    
    Renewal Fee Reduction      
    Continuing Education      
    Required CE Units and Courses    
    Inactive Licenses
  • Chapter 6 Other Practice Requirements    
    Infection Control    
    Marking of Dentures    
    Restorative Materials Fact Sheet      
    Advertising    
    Change of Name      
    Group Practice Name
  • Index

AIDS and HIV Essentials

Table of Contents

Worldwide, an estimated 33 million persons are living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two thirds of HIV infections are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The U.S. HIV/AIDS Epidemic

This text focuses on the HIV infection and AIDS (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in the United States, where approximately 456,000 persons are currently living with AIDS. In addition, an estimated 256,000 persons in the United States are living with HIV infection that has not progressed to AIDS. Many of these people may not be aware that they are HIV-infected.

At least 583,300 persons have died of AIDS in the United States since the epidemic began in 1981. However, U.S. AIDS deaths started to decline in 1996. To a great extent, these decreases are the result of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The various HAART regimens use multiple potent drug combinations that suppress HIV replication (the ability of the virus to copy itself) in the body. This therapy permits some improvement in patients' deteriorating immune systems.

The Risk of Complacency

Despite the success of HAART, people must not become complacent; the HIV epidemic in the United States is far from over. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report continuing high-risk behaviors (especially unprotected sex), even among people found to be infected.

Some persons mistakenly assume that HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy are not infectious; others let preventive measures slide, in the erroneous belief that totally effective treatment for HIV infection now exists. HAART therapy cannot "cure" HIV infection or AIDS.

What You Can Do

All health care workers can help to educate patients about preventing HIV infection. Some can also assess patients' risk of infection, encourage patients to be tested for HIV infection, and provide care for patients who test HIV-positive.

Proper treatment can prolong life for HIV-infected individuals. The treatment goals are:

  1. Preserving and strengthening the immune system by suppressing HIV replication.
  2. Preventing opportunistic illnesses (e.g., Pneumocystis pneumonia, oral candidiasis, HIV wasting syndrome, and other conditions described in Chapter 8). These occur when patients' immune systems have deteriorated to levels at which they can no longer prevent certain microorganisms from causing such illnesses.
  3. Diagnosing and treating opportunistic illnesses early.
  4. Optimizing patients' quality of life, from the HIV incubation period through the final stages of AIDS.

This text presents the most recent information relating to these four goals. Particularly important are the data health care workers can use to educate afflicted patients. The more these patients learn about HIV infection, the better equipped they are to participate in health care decision-making.

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